Collection: Wood Mihrab & Minbar

The mihrab and minbar are important architectural features found in mosques. Here's a brief description of each:

  1. Mihrab: The mihrab is a niche or alcove in the wall of a mosque that indicates the direction of the Kaaba in Mecca, Saudi Arabia. It is positioned on the qibla wall, which is the wall facing towards Mecca. The mihrab serves as a focal point for prayer and is where the imam (prayer leader) stands during congregational prayers.

The mihrab is usually elaborately decorated with intricate designs, calligraphy, and geometric patterns. It symbolizes the spiritual connection between the worshipper and the Kaaba, which is considered the holiest site in Islam. The design of the mihrab often reflects the architectural style of the mosque and can be made of materials such as marble, mosaic tiles, or woodwork.

  1. Minbar: The minbar is a raised platform or pulpit located next to the mihrab in a mosque. It is used by the imam to deliver sermons (khutbah) during Friday prayers and on special occasions. The minbar is typically accessed by a set of steps, and it provides the imam with a visible and elevated position to address the congregation.

The design of the minbar can vary depending on regional styles and architectural traditions. It is often intricately carved and decorated, featuring geometric patterns, calligraphy, and sometimes even precious materials. The minbar is considered a symbol of authority and leadership within the mosque, and it has historical significance as a platform where important religious teachings and messages are delivered.

Both the mihrab and minbar are significant elements in mosque architecture, emphasizing the direction of prayer and facilitating the spiritual experience of worshippers. They hold cultural and historical importance, representing the central role of the mosque as a place of worship, education, and community gathering for Muslims.